Changing the World: November 30 – Supporting Local People


Today’s suggestion is one I really do like – it is about supporting the local people of isolated rural villages, especially in Third World countries (not that the book really makes that distinction).

To do this, the suggestion is to buy products produced by local artisans via the web. This is a great suggestion and one I think I will try and support from time to time. It is a great way to assist people in difficult situations.

Some useful websites:

www.villageleap.com

www.eShopAfrica.com

www.novica.com

A response to reading ‘365 Ways to Change the World,’ by Michael Norton

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Changing the World: November 26 – Buy Nothing Day


Today’s suggestion is about supporting the ‘Buy Nothing Day’ initiative.  Buy Nothing Day is usually held at the end of November. The aim of the day is to raise awareness of our world’s dwindling resources and our preoccupation with unnecessary things.

I like the sound of this day and will try and support it, as well as being more aware of what I buy and why.

www.ecoplan.org/ibnd/ib_index.htm

A response to reading ‘365 Ways to Change the World,’ by Michael Norton

Changing the World: November 23 – Stickers to Save Water and Power


The suggestion for today was to try and save water and electricity by remembering to turn off the light switch, a power point, a tap, etc. Because we forget these things the book suggests making stickers to place next to a light switch for example.

This is a somewhat simple solution to a possibly costly memory issue, in that forgetting to flick a switch/turn off a tap costs money by way of the bill, as well as costing more in terms of environmental costs.

I have found myself being far more efficient in these areas in the last little while and hardly ever forget to turn off a light when not needed, turn off a tap when brushing teeth, etc. It did however take a lot of self-discipline and I can see how stickers/post-it’s, etc, can be handy for some people.

A response to reading ‘365 Ways to Change the World,’ by Michael Norton