2020 Caine Prize for African Writing Winner


The link below is to another article reporting on the winner of the 2020 Caine Prize for African Writing, Nigerian-British writer Irenosen Okojie for her short story ‘Grace Jones.’

For more visit:
https://www.booksandpublishing.com.au/articles/2020/07/29/154430/nigerian-british-writer-okojie-wins-caine-prize-for-african-writing/

2020 Edge Hill Short Story Prize Longlist


The link below is to an article reporting on the longlist for the 2020 Edge Hill Short Story Prize.

For more visit:
https://www.booksandpublishing.com.au/articles/2020/07/07/153100/ocallaghan-longlisted-for-edge-hill-short-story-prize/

2020 Caine Prize Winner


The links below are to articles reporting on the winner of the 2020 Caine Prize for African writing – Irenosen Okojie for ‘Grace Jones.’

For more visit:
https://lithub.com/nigerian-british-writer-irenosen-okojie-has-won-the-caine-prize-for-a-story-about-a-grace-jones-impersonator/
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2020/jul/27/irenosen-okojie-wins-the-caine-prize-for-stunning-short-story-grace-jones

2020 Commonwealth Short Story Prize Winner


The link below is to an article reporting on the winner of the 2020 Commonwealth Short Story Prize, Kritika Pandey, for ‘The Great Indian Tee and Snakes’.

For more visit:
https://www.booksandpublishing.com.au/articles/2020/07/01/152862/pandey-named-overall-winner-of-2020-commonwealth-short-story-prize/

2020 Commonwealth Short Story Prize Shortlist


The link below is to an article that reports on the shortlist for the 2020 Commonwealth Short Story Prize.

For more visit:
https://www.booksandpublishing.com.au/articles/2020/04/21/149426/anz-writers-shortlisted-for-commonwealth-short-story-prize/

2019 Winner of the Audible Short Story Award


The link below is to an article reporting on the winner of the 2019 Audible Sort Story Award, Danielle McLaughlin, for ‘A Partial List of the Saved.’

For more visit:
https://www.booksandpublishing.com.au/articles/2019/09/13/139230/mclaughlin-wins-2019-sunday-times-audible-short-story-award/

2019 Winner of the Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize


The link below is to an article reporting on the 2019 winner of the Australian Book Review’s Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize, Sonja Dechian, for ‘The Point-Blank Murder.’

For more visit:
https://www.booksandpublishing.com.au/articles/2019/09/12/139114/dechian-wins-2019-abr-elizabeth-jolley-short-story-prize/

Stories for hyperlinked times: the short story cycle and Rebekah Clarkson’s Barking Dogs



A short story cycle is a hybrid of a novel and short story collection.
Rodion Kutsaev/Unsplash, CC BY

Amelia Walker, University of South Australia

Why do we tell stories, and how are they crafted? In this series, we unpick the work of the writer on both page and screen.


Affirm Press

We live hyperlinked lives, expected to be switched on and logged in 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Time is a dwindling resource, multitasking is our default setting. We’re constantly reading: online articles, emails, social media posts. But for many of us, this dip-in, dip-out reading feels dissatisfying. We crave deeper engagement.

Enter the short story cycle — a hybrid of a novel and a short story collection. In her collection, Barking Dogs, Rebekah Clarkson offers a superbly constructed creative feat into the form, giving us a strong insight into how short story cycles operate and what they can offer to readers and writers.

A long history

Short story cycles are by no means new. Notable twentieth century examples include James Joyce’s Dubliners, Flannery O’Connor’s A Good Man Is Hard to Find, William Faulkner’s Go Down, Moses and Louise Erdrich’s Love Medicine.

However, until recently, short story cycles have received less attention and have been harder to get published than novels. This appears to be changing. Twenty-first century American authors Elizabeth Strout and Jennifer Eagan have had significant success with the form.


Scribe

Recent Australian contributions to the re-emerging short story cycle tradition include The Turning by Tim Winton (2004), Shadowboxing by Tony Birch (2006), The Boat by Nam Lee (2009), Transactions by Ali Alizideh (2013), Plane Tree Drive by Lynette Washington (2017) and Barking Dogs by Rebekah Clarkson (2017).

Barking Dogs was penned by Clarkson as part of her PhD in creative writing through the University of Adelaide. It represents the product of her extensive research into short story cycles and related literary practices.

Clarkson describes the short story cycle as a form in which each individual story can stand alone as an independent work of art, but when arranged with other stories, generates interconnection and perhaps interdependence. The 13 stories in her Barking Dogs can all be read and enjoyed in themselves, but are enhanced when read and appreciated in context. The book as a whole offers something else yet again — a greater tapestry, to which each story adds different threads.

Connections, recurring roles

Of the many links between separate yet connecting episodes in Barking Dogs, the most obvious is place. The book’s setting is Mount Barker, an Adelaide Hills town, portrayed at a moment of major change as housing developers carve the formerly idyllic, quiet community into a bustling outpost of aspirational suburbia.

Issues of this transformation — social, environmental, and economic — are considered from multiple points of view, through the voices of characters whose attitudes differ. This reflects Clarkson’s desire (expressed via email) to “represent a real place through fiction without privileging any particular perspective”.

Character provides another crucial set of interconnections in Barking Dogs. In several cases, major characters from particular stories reappear as minor characters or visitors in others. Elsewhere, this means revisiting the same main character at a different time and in a different situation. In the story Raising Boys, for example, Malcolm Wheeler is a suburban father dealing with relatively mundane albeit relatable everyday issues including marriage tensions, a child struggling at school, and complaints from neighbours about his son’s dog, which barks noisily.

Stories in the cycle make reference to popular parenting guides on raising boys.
Annie Spratt/Unsplash, CC BY

A later story, The Five Truths of Manhood, reintroduces Malcolm as he learns that he has cancer. The diagnosis pushes Malcolm’s underlying frailties and reveals different aspects to the characters of his wife and son. This casts new light on how all three characters behave in the story. The references both stories’ titles make to Steve Biddulph’s books on manhood guide the reader to reflect on how social constructions of masculinity matter for families and individuals.

Another recurring character is Sophie Barlow, a missing schoolgirl who, though not directly present in any story, figures in the memories, thoughts and dreams of other characters.

We first encounter Sophie in Something Special, Something Rare, in which she has left her family home early in the morning but has not yet officially disappeared. Sophie’s father, Graham, reflects on how Sophie didn’t want to go bird watching with the family, and thus slowly recognises his own emotional disconnection from his daughter. Her tragic disappearance is foreshadowed towards the end of the story, when Graham realises:

He missed her. He really missed her. He’d been missing her for a couple years.

In contrast to this deeply personal view of Sophie, the story World Peace concerns Janice, a 12-year-old schoolgirl who cannot remember Sophie’s surname but remembers liking the sound of it:

Sophie Someone. It was the name of a girl you’d want to be friends with. It had a feel to it […] like a good song.

Sophie is remembered differently yet again in two other stories, and thereby hovers, ghost-like, throughout the collection. Her tragic demise falls between the cracks of the community, which is mirrored by how she falls between the cracks of stories.

The hidden tale of Sophie, among other recurrent themes and motifs of Barking Dogs, means each story in the book can be read again and again, with new levels of meaning gained each time. The book therefore meets Clarkson’s own key criterion for a successful short story cycle.

In email interview, Clarkson declares “the best response a reader can have is the desire to flip back to the beginning and read again”. Barking Dogs certainly provokes this desire, demonstrating the multifarious potentials of the short story cycle as a form that readers, writers and publishers will continue to develop and embrace in the coming years.The Conversation

Amelia Walker, Lecturer in Creative Writing, University of South Australia

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

2019 BAME Story Prize


The link below is to an article reporting on the finalists of the 2019 Guardian 4th Estate Short Story Prize.

For more visit:
https://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2019/aug/15/finalists-revealed-in-2019-guardian-4th-estate-short-story-prize

2019 Commonwealth Short Story Prize


The link below is to an article that takes a look at the regional winners of the 2019 Commonwealth Short Story Prize.

For more visit:
https://publishingperspectives.com/2019/05/commonwealth-short-story-prize-announces-its-five-2019-regional-winners/