Book Review: Collapse, by Richard Stephenson


Collapse‘Collapse’ by Richard Stephenson is book one in the ‘New America’ series and I believe Stephenson’s first novel. The novel is set in the year 2027, with the USA falling apart. It is in the grip of the 2nd Great Depression and is at war with the Great Empire of Iran. The state of Florida has been devastated by a hurricane that has left over 1 million people dead and Texas is about to face the same fate. The government is about to fall. The people are descending into anarchy. What will become of the USA?

Though a first novel, the suspense and action of the novel is first rate. It is very easy to read and carries you along quite easily. However, there are serious issues with the grammar and spelling, as well as some fairly obvious errors in the actual text of the story. A good proof reader should have picked up on these mistakes and that would have resulted in a far more polished and professional  product.

There is also a short sex scene tacked onto the end of the story which I thought was somewhat tacky and unnecessary. It did nothing for the story as a whole and was completely out of place in the overall development of the novel.

If you can see past these obvious flaws without too much prejudice, the novel is a very good read and I do look forward to picking up the story when the next book in the series is released in 2013.

Buy this book at Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Collapse-Richard-Stephenson/dp/1477654631/

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Article: Amazon and Sex Tourism Allegations


The link below is to an article reporting on an ebook being sold through Amazon that is alleged to promote child sex tourism.

For more visit:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/02/amazon-sex-tourism-pedophilia-love146_n_1735427.html

Changing the World: December 14 – Sex Strike


Ok, this suggestion appears to be one for the women – at least the examples I’ve read about were all women. I’m not sure that this idea would do a lot.

For more information:

www.globalwomenstrike.net

 

A response to reading ‘365 Ways to Change the World,’ by Michael Norton