Terrible Things Happen in Bookshops


The link below is to an article that takes a look at some gross things found in bookshops (and yes, some are truly disgusting).

For more visit:
https://bookriot.com/2019/02/21/grossiest-things-at-a-bookstore/

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Found Your Favourite Book?


The link below is to an article that points out 10 signs that show you have found your favourite book.

For more visit:
http://www.epicreads.com/blog/10-signs-youve-found-your-favorite-book/

Article: First Fairytale of Hans Christian Andersen Found


The link below is to an interesting article about Hans Christian Andersen and the discovery of what is believed to have been his first fairytale written while a schoolboy.

For more visit:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/dec/13/hans-christian-andersen-first-fairytale

John Adams, by David McCullough


I have just finished watching the mini series ‘John Adams,’ starring Paul Giamatti as John Adams and Laura Linney as Abigail Adams. I found the mini series to be difficult to watch, as it was hardly brilliant drama despite the rhetoric on the DVD case. Not being American was perhaps a reason for my lack of enthusiasm for the mini series. I found it to be a disappointment as a viewing spectacle. But how true to the man and to history was the mini series? This is a question that now has my attention – for the portrayal of John Adams in the production was hardly that of a man to be admired.

Adams comes across as a self-centred, vain glorious man, with poor people skills and a terrible father and husband. He appears to seek his own advancement to the expense of those about him and also to be full of envy and petty jealousy. He also appears to be a somewhat poor diplomat and politician overall – even though he held the greatest office in the United States, as second president following that of George Washington.

So now I come to the book on which this mini series was based, ‘John Adams,’ by David McCullough. I am now going to read this book and see just how true to the book and actual events the mini series achieved. I find it difficult to believe that Adams could have been the way he was protrayed in the film – now I will seek out the truth for myself.

Edmund Barton, by John Reynolds


Yes, I have finally managed to put up another post on this Blog – been quite a while I know. I apologise for that – been very busy with other pursuits.

Today’s book review is on ‘Edmund Barton,’ by John Reynolds. This book is the first in a series on Australia’s Prime Ministers by Bookman Press. The Bookman Press series sought to re-publish the best biographies on each of the Australian Prime Ministers to coincide with the centenary of Australian Federation. ‘Edmund Barton,’ by John Reynolds, was first published in 1948.

This book, though about Edmund Barton, is also a good introduction to the process of Australia becoming a federation of colonies to form the modern day nation of Australia. A biography of Barton must be a study of the beginning of Federation as Barton was probably one of the most important players in bringing Federation to pass, which also meant the creation of Australia as one nation. It is a fascinating introduction to just how a modern Australia was born from the federation of the various colonies that were then situated on the Australian mainland and in Tasmania.

As far as reading goes, I found the book to contain much that interested me, as I have not read or studied a lot on the federation of Australia and the process by which it was achieved. For me this has been an important addition to my understanding of Australian history in an area in which my understanding was quite poor. Having said that, I do not think the book is necessarily an easy read, but requires discipline to keep at it.

Changing the World: December 19 – Blind Waiters


I won’t dwell too long on this suggestion – not because I don’t want to support the cause, which is to support blind people to find employment as waiters. There doesn’t seem to be an Australian or for that matter, a widely global application of the idea.

In several European cities there are restaurants which are in darkness, giving employment opportunities for the blind and increasing awareness of what it is like to be blind.

More information can be found at:

www.blindekuh.ch

www.danslenoir.com

 

A response to reading ‘365 Ways to Change the World,’ by Michael Norton