On the Books: Google appears set to win case against Authors Guild


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Apple to Settle in Ebook Lawsuit


The link below is to an article that reports on the news that Apple will settle in the ebook pricing lawsuit.

For more visit:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/apple-agrees-to-450-million-settlement-in-e-book-suits/2014/07/16/a1851e66-0d2f-11e4-8c9a-923ecc0c7d23_story.html

Apple settles ebook case, agrees to pay consumers over price-fixing


Gigaom

Apple(s appl) has finally bowed out of a high stakes legal battle over ebooks and agreed to a settlement that could soon see the tech giant paying out millions to customers who purchased titles at online retailers like Amazon(s amzn) and Barnes & Noble(s bn).

According to a letter to the court filed in New York, and embedded below, Apple has reached an agreement with class-action lawyers and state attorneys general that will see the parties cancel a damages trial set for July.

The settlement is under seal for now and must be approved by the court, but is likely to be worth hundreds of millions of dollars. The money will come on top of the $160 million or so that the five publishers agreed to pay as a result of settlements reached last year.

Apple will, however, continue to appeal a jury verdict from last year in which U.S. District Judge Denise Cote…

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Apple ebooks damages trial to start July 14 after appeals court refuses delay


Gigaom

An appeals court this week refused to halt a trial that could require Apple(s aapl) to pay hundreds of millions of dollars over price-fixing, even as the company continues to deny any wrong-doing and seeks an appeal.

In a succinct order, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit said a trial can go forward on July 14 that will determine how much Apple should pay for brokering a conspiracy with book publishers to fix the price of ebooks.

In April, class action lawyer Steve Berman said, “Consumers could see a judgment of between $750 to $850 million,” as punishment related to Justice Denise Cote’s conclusion last year that Apple organized the scheme.

The five publishers who participated in the conspiracy have already settled, resulting in consumers receiving emails telling them of credits paid to their Kindle(s amzn) and Barnes &  Nobel accounts. This week’s appeals court ruling means that those consumers are likely to receive emails notifying…

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The absurd ebook case: Apple fights on as consumers spend settlement money at Amazon


Gigaom

The high-fives must have been flying at Amazon(s amzn) this morning: millions of the company’s customers got notices to spend credits at its Kindle store, and Amazon didn’t have to pay a cent. Meanwhile, rival Apple(s aapl) will likely underwrite an even bigger shopping spree for Amazon customers sometime yet year.

Welcome to the ironic denouement of l’affaire ebooks, which reached a climax in 2013 when a federal judge found that Apple had brokered a conspiracy with book publishers to fix prices. The legal tussle resulted in the publishers settling their cases — which is what paid for the customer credits that went out today — while Apple fought on alone.

For now, the biggest winner is Amazon, which already dominated the ebook market at the time of the price-fixing scheme in 2010. Today, as a result of lawsuits brought by the Justice Department and state governments, Amazon is in an even stronger position with the publishers; it will also get a healthy cut of the $160 million or…

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Google Books Lawsuit Appeal


The Google Books lawsuit has sprung back into life with an appeal being launched by the Author’s Guild. I certainly don’t support this appeal. This lot don’t seem to get that Google Books has the potential to sell more copies of their works for a start.

For more visit:
http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2013/12/29/authors-guild-files-appeal/

Belly Ache Article on Ebooks and Google Books


The link below is to an article that comments on the recent Google Books lawsuit victory and on ebooks in general. It is one of those traditional books belly ache type of articles.

For more visit:
http://www.forbes.com/sites/nathanraab/2013/11/18/why-the-google-books-ruling-might-impact-you-and-your-books/

Whatever you think of Google as a company, the book-scanning decision is the right one


Gigaom

On Thursday, U.S. Circuit Court Judge Denny Chin handed down a decision in one of the longest-running copyright cases in recent memory: namely, the lawsuit launched by the Authors’ Guild against Google (s goog), claiming that its book-scanning project amounted to a massive case of copyright infringement. Chin, however, ruled that the project is protected under the “fair use” principle, since there are clear public benefits to the indexing of millions of books.

Over the past few years (the case was originally launched in 2005) the Authors Guild has won support for its case from Google critics who believe that the web giant has amassed too much power — the same critics who have pushed for repeated antitrust investigations of the company’s quasi-monopoly in the search and internet-advertising markets, among other things.

But regardless of whether you believe Google is too big for its britches, and is trying to…

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Google wins book-scanning case: judge finds “fair use,” cites many benefits


Gigaom

Google(s goog) has won a resounding victory in its eight-year copyright battle with the Authors Guild over the search giant’s controversial decision to scan more than 20 million books from libraries and make them available on the internet.

In a ruling (embedded below) issued Thursday morning in New York, US Circuit Judge Denny Chin said the book scanning amounted to fair use because it was “highly transformative” and because it didn’t harm the market for the original work.

“Google Books provides significant public benefits,” Chin wrote, describing it as “an essential research tool” and noting that the scanning service has expanded literary access for the blind and helped preserve the text of old books from physical decay.

Chin also rejected the theory that Google was depriving authors of income, noting that the company does not sell the scans or make whole copies of books available. He concluded, instead, that Google…

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