Not My Review: Practicing the Power – Welcoming the Gifts of the Holy Spirit in Your Life, by Sam Storms


The link below is to a book review of ‘Practicing the Power – Welcoming the Gifts of the Holy Spirit in Your Life,’ by Sam Storms.

For more visit:
https://www.thegospelcoalition.org/article/book-review-practicing-power-sam-storms

Not My Review: Chosen for Life – The Case for Divine Election, by Sam Storms


The links below are to book reviews of the excellent ‘Chosen for Life – The Case For Divine Election,’ by Sam Storms.

For more visit:
http://tonyreinke.com/2007/02/06/book-review-chosen-for-life-by-sam-storms-1581348436-9781581348439/
http://www.alexchediak.com/2007/08/guest_review_of_sam_storms_cho.php
http://www.thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/erikraymond/2007/10/24/chosen-for-life/

‘Kept for Jesus’ by Sam Storms: A Review


Not My Review: Kept for Jesus, by Sam Storms

The Reformed Reader

Kept for Jesus: What the New Testament Really Teaches about Assurance of Salvation and Eternal Security Will I fall away from Jesus?  This is one question that sometimes comes up in the Christian life – and it is addressed in the Bible.  Sam Storms discusses this topic in his new book, Kept for Jesus (Wheaton: Crossway, 2015).  This book isn’t an exhaustive explanation of perseverance (preservation) of the saints; rather, it is specifically a discussion of the texts in the New Testament that teach this truth.  Storms also takes some time to deal with the difficult texts that seem to teach Christians can fall away.  In this volume, Storms frequently quotes and builds upon the work of contemporary Baptist theologians such as John Piper, Tom Schreiner, and Wayne Grudem.

There are eleven chapters in this book (covering just over 190 pages).  In the firstchapter, Storms talks about perseverance in John 6 and 10.  In the second chapter, he talks about some tough…

View original post 550 more words

Book Review: A God Entranced Vision of All Things – The Legacy of Jonathan Edwards


I have started reading ‘A God Entranced Vision of All Things – The Legacy of Jonathan Edwards,’ with John Piper and Justin Taylor as the general editors of the book. It was published in 2004 by Crossway Books and has 275 pages.

This book is a collection of studies on Jonathan Edwards – his life, ministry and legacy. Each chapter investigates some facet of Edwards and each chapter is penned by a different author. The authors of these studies include John Piper, J. I. Packer, Paul Helm and Sam Storms, names widely recognized in reformed circles. The studies are expansions of messages delivered at a Desiring God Ministries conference in October 2003, celebrating 300 years since the birth of Jonathan Edwards.

In my journey through this book, I have thus far reached the end of chapter 2. What I can say is that this book is very easy to read, but difficult to put down. It has the readability that many books associated with Desiring God Ministries have, yet the weightiness of the subject matter does not allow one to just move through the book without serious reflection.

The book doesn’t leave you contemplating the past and Jonathan Edwards in particular, but the God of Jonathan Edwards and leads the reader to a serious contemplation of the glorious God who is all. Edwards life was about God and his enjoyment of Him, and this is the subject of chapter 1, ‘A God-Entranced Vision of All Things: Why We Need Jonathan Edwards 300 Years Later,’ by John Piper. Chapter 2 gives an overview of the life and legacy of Jonathan Edwards in ‘Jonathan Edwards: His Life and Legacy,’ by Stephen J. Nichols. With chapter 3, ‘Sarah Edwards: Jonathan’s Home and Haven,’ by Noel Piper, the subject matters of the first section of the book is dealt with brilliantly, ‘Part 1 – The Life and Legacy of Edards.’ Certainly I can speak to the first two chapters as having achieved that and I have little doubt the third will compliment the first 2.

The treatment of the guiding principles of Edwards’ life and the brief overview of it, leads the reader to the God of Jonathan Edwards and this would surely be the legacy that Edwards would have hoped for.