Politics with Michelle Grattan: Christopher Pyne on being ‘the ultimate insider’


Michelle Grattan, University of Canberra

Former Liberal Minister Christopher Pyne attracted critics for his political front. But he always had plenty of friends and networks, enabling him often to be a player, if not always a “fixer”.

After his election to the South Australian seat of Sturt at age 25, he went on to hold senior portfolios, notably education and defence, and to stride the parliamentary stage as Leader of the House of Representatives.

In his memoir, The Insider, the former politician provides his take, humorous and candid, on a tumultuous 26 parliamentary years.

In this podcast, Pyne talks about life after politics, and stories from the ‘Canberra bubble’.

“I don’t miss politics at all – because I left happy, and I wanted to go.

“So I’m not one of these politicians that was dragged kicking and screaming. I left when people wanted me to stay, which is a great rarity.”

Pyne is ultra candid about his ambition to be prime minister:

“I think when you’re 15, and you decided you want to be a member of the House of Representatives, you kind of think ‘I’m going to dream big.’ So of course I dreamt to be prime minister”.

Reality, it appears, didn’t hit for quite a while.

“I think that week when Malcolm [Turnbull] was deposed and nobody was suggesting that I should be running for leader, it dawned on me that the generation that was being elected, which was Scott Morrison and Josh Frydenberg, were a generation different to me.”The Conversation

Michelle Grattan, Professorial Fellow, University of Canberra

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

The truth about the death and burial of Charles Dickens – In Depth Out Loud podcast



Charles Dickens in his study at Gad’s Hill Place in Kent, where he died in 1870.
Charles Dickens Museum

Leon Litvack, Queen’s University Belfast

This episode of The Conversation’s In Depth Out Loud podcast, features the work of Leon Litvack at Queen’s University Belfast, a world authority on Charles Dickens, on what happened after the death of the author.


Listen on Apple Podcasts


His new research has uncovered the never-before-explored areas of the great author’s sudden death on June 9 1870, and his subsequent burial.

Dickens’s death created an early predicament for his family. Where was he to be buried? Near his home (as he would have wished) or in that great public pantheon, Poet’s Corner in Westminster Abbey (which was clearly against his wishes)? But two ambitious men put their own interests ahead of the great writer and his family in an act of institutionally-sanctioned bodysnatching.

You can read the text version of this in depth article here. The audio version is read by Michael Parker and edited by Gemma Ware.

This story came out of a project at The Conversation called Insights. Sponsored by Research England, our Insights team generate in depth articles derived from interdisciplinary research. You can read their stories here, or subscribe to In Depth Out Loud to listen to more of their articles in the coming months.

The music in In Depth Out Loud is Night Caves, by Lee Rosevere.

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StitcherThe Conversation

Leon Litvack, Associate Professor, Queen’s University Belfast

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

On Audiobooks and Podcasts


The link below is to an article that contains a listing of various articles to do with tips and tools for audiobook and podcast creation, etc.

For more visit:
https://digitalpubbing.com/tips-and-tricks-and-the-latest-updates-in-audiobooks-and-podcasting/